#mensex
 

#ANAL SEX

What is the difference between passive (receptive) and active (insertive) anal sex? First of all, the position, of course, but the difference lies also in the risk of becoming infected.

 

PASSIVE ANAL SEX

or being penetrated, is extremely risky in terms of spreading all kinds of sexually transmitted infections (STI). The most risky is when your partner finishes inside you. The rectal mucosa absorbs liquids directly into the bloodstream, and if the partner’s semen contains HIV, then it will also find its way directly into your bloodstream. HIV can also be found in pre-ejaculate.

Condoms are effective, but there are still some STIs (for example, syphilis and genital warts) that may be transmitted, especially if the condom does not cover the whole body of the penis down to the root of the penis.

 

ACTIVE ANAL SEX

or penetrating without a condom, is slightly less risky compared to passive anal sex. However, the microorganisms causing STIs present inside the rectum or its immediate surroundings may infect the penetrating partner by passing through his urethra.

 

HOW TO REDUCE THE RISK?

Always use a condom when engaged in anal sex! And, if you have sex with several partners, use a new condom for each partner.

 

FISTING

It may seem that fisting (anal sex with a hand) is pretty safe. However, if you fist several partners and rectal discharge or blood of the HIV-positive partner remains on your hand, it could also infect the other partner.

 

HOW TO REDUCE THE RISK?

Use medical rubber gloves.

Where to go for testing

#analsex

How big is your risk?

Evaluate risk

#howmuchyourisk

Share if you care

Share this page

#sharingiscaring

Where to test?

Read more

* offer lasts till date

Important news into your mailbox

The website of #sexbetween men is meant to provide practical and thoroughly honest information about this topic. The website has been created by the National Institute for Health Development, so it can be fully trusted. Furthermore, you can order a free testing kit to test yourself for sexually transmitted infections at home.